ACP117 What Is The Difference Between a Legacy and a Major Airline?

by CarlValeri on October 21, 2016

hud-in-flight

Carl and Eric Crump are back for another great question and answer episode! This show features answers to questions from our listeners, including about the difference between legacy and major airlines, flight school choices, and applying when under qualified (the answer might surprise you).

Sponsor Message:

Don’t forget to check out our coaching services which include career counseling and mentorship, interview preparation, resume and cover letter review. Go To AviationCareersPodcast.com and click on Coaching.

Announcements:

Carl is the coach of the Polk State Flight Team, which is raising money to go to regionals. Carl is asking listeners to consider donating 1 hour of their pay to help the team get there. Would you please consider making a donation here?

In This episode we discuss:

  • For financial advice, I recommend Ric Edelman.
  • Are there scholarships out there for people who already have a Private Pilot's License?
  • The Difference Between a Legacy and a Major Airline?
  • Flight schools in Florida vs. finishing my degree at the school I am at?
  • Are people being hired when they are under qualified, such has not having the minimum number of hours?
  • What qualifications or certifications should you get to set yourself apart from other candidates?

 

Pick Of The Week:

ACP088 Carl’s Theory of Negativity and How to Stay Positive

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

David Rodwell October 29, 2016 at 6:39 pm

Fabulous job Gentlemen,

I love what you are doing. This is so important to up and coming aviators!!

Back in 2001, I was downsized Riffed, laid-off, furloughed…it short I lost my long time job shortly after 9/11…maybe because of 9/11. After 9/11 it was hard to even buy a job.

After days and weeks of searching and soul searching, I discovered the career path I was passionate about…Aviation. I had been licensed since 1979 when I was 30 but in 2001 I was over 50.

At that age, all I had open was banner towing, flying Sky Divers, ferrying canceled checks, blood samples or flight instruction and those were almost all minimum wage.

So what if you are middle aged and the airlines don’t want to spend several hundred thousand to millions on your training just to have you age out in a few years?

I discovered an unexpected answer…Aerial Photography! I learned everything I could, talked to others in the field and went out and started my business. I was blessed with immediate success.

Before long I was flying all the time photographing all over my state and even had jobs in neighboring states. Soon folks started asking me how could they do all this and have an aviation career in Aerial Photography? I was advising regularly on the phone and by emails and one day everything changed. My life would never be the same.

An over the road trucker from a little town in Utah called me and asked if he could come 2000 miles to the east coast to see what I did and how it worked. Randy showed up all 6’4″ of him and for a week I taught him everything I could.

Randy returned to Utah, sold his truck, bought an airplane and to this day is feeding his family doing something he loves flying his own plane and taking photos.

Soon others came and before long I was in the business of teaching and taking photos. I got an invite to go to Oshkosh, WI to teach Aerial Photography seminars at AirVenture. Then I wrote a book currently doing remarkably well on Amazon called The Aerial Photography Manual.

The rest is history, I have been blessed to have taught more Aerial Photographers how to get into aviation when the airlines just are not the right answer for them due to age, medical conditions or the money than anyone else in the country.

So, there are answers out there for folks even if the left seat of a Dreamliner is not in your future.

Thanks for all that you do for our industry. If I can ever help, I would be honored!

David Rodwell
Aerial Photography Experts
North Carolina, Birthplace of Aviation

Reply

Leave a Comment


*

Previous post:

Next post: